Unlocking the Social Cure

This half day workshop is a great opportunity for housing associations to learn about the benefits of implementing group-based interventions and their positive outcomes for the health and wellbeing of tenants.

There is now a wealth of evidence from medical, epidemiological, psychological and sociological literatures that social connectedness is a powerful predictor of mental health, physical health, cognitive health and general well-being outcomes:

  • The effects of social connectedness are comparable to quitting smoking and exceed those for obesity, high blood pressure, and physical inactivity. Indeed, people with good social relationships have been found to have a 50% greater likelihood of survival than people with poor relationships. 
  • Analysis of the effects of social connectedness in the U.S. led to the conclusion that if you don’t belong to a group, but join one, you cut your risk of dying in the next year in half. 
  • Active engagement in a greater number of social networks slows cognitive decline in seniors  and predicts remission for people with depression.
  • Among those with a history of depression, social connectedness actually protects against relapse: people with no social group connections have a 41% chance of relapse compared to only 15% in people with 3 or more group memberships.Social interventions come in many forms — they can involve support groups, activity or interest groups, sporting groups, and various community groups. Yet these are only successful in enhancing health to the extent that groups are meaningful to, and valued by, their members. In addition, people’s needs, interests and motivations change, so groups that provide a solution at one point may not do so at another.  

Social interventions come in many forms — they can involve support groups, activity or interest groups, sporting groups, and various community groups. Yet these are only successful in enhancing health to the extent that groups are meaningful to, and valued by, their members. In addition, people’s needs, interests and motivations change, so groups that provide a solution at one point may not do so at another.

In this half-day workshop you will be:

  • Introduced to the Social Identity Approach to Health which provides a new way of tackling threats to health and well-being.
  • Understand the evidence underpinning this approach and how best to apply it in practice.
  • Learn about the effects that social disconnection from groups of others has on mental health and well-being.
  • Receive a brief introduction to a new intervention — GROUPS 4 HEALTH — that aims to help people manage their group-based networks in an effort to unlock a social cure that supports their health and well-being in the longer term.

    Speakers: Prof. Catherine Haslam and Prof. Alex Haslam, School of Psychology, University of Queensland 

    The workshop is free for housing providers and attendance is limited to one delegate per organisation.

    Jul
    14
    Masterclass
    Thursday 14th July 2016 - 14:30 to 17:30